Lysimachia

Loosestrife

According to William Cole’s Art of Simpling (1656), Loosestrife prevents oxen from fighting. Some say the name derives from a Greek word meaning “to dissolve strife.” What we could debate is whether form follows function, or vice versa, because this showy group is as hardy as it is attractive.

Some species are tall, others are low, but all are vigorous and easy to grow—so let them loose in cool, moist locations such as woodlands, bogs or waterside meadows. A varied group, each offers a unique foliage form.

<i>Lysimachia clethroides</i>

Racemes arching like shooting stars, bursting into soft white flowers against a deep green galaxy of foliage, make graceful, upright Gooseneck the jewel of the woodland setting. It’s a toss-up between growing it for flowers or foliage, but either way, it’s a winner.

Blooms July–September.

Size: 3' 0" – 4' 0" high x 0" & spreading wide.

Hardy to zone 4.

<i>Lysimachia ephemerum</i> <i>Lysimachia ephemerum</i>

Lofty, narrow spikes of pearly white starlike flowers grace this hard-to-find European species. Non-invasive Lysimachia ephemerum grows in a clump, rather than spreading by runners like its more aggressive cousins. Joined at the base around sturdy, upright stems, the glaucous gray-green leaves are opposite and lanceolate in shape. An intriguing flower for arrangements, this Lysimachia’s soothing colors are a gentle match for Thalictrum flavum ssp. glaucum.

Blooms August–September.

Size: 4' 0" – 5' 0" high x 18" wide.

Hardy to zone 6.

<i>Lysimachia nummularia</i> ‘Aurea’

Native to Europe and Russia, Golden Creeping Jenny has naturalized in North America. Bearing tiny, bright yellow flowers, it creates a striking understory of round, golden foliage and, if planted at the edge of a pond, will reach into the water like rays of sunlight. For stunning contrast, place near plants with purple foliage.

Blooms April–September.

Size: 2" high x 0" & spreading wide.

Hardy to zone 5.

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Garden Design 2019 Trends Report

Deborah's arrangement was featured in the 2019 Garden Design Trends Report! Check out the article here.



Current Staff's Favorite Plant

Current Staff's Favorite Plant

Our featured plant: Asarum splendens

Fantastic Fall Foliage, Last Hurrah Sale!!

Fantastic Fall Foliage.... The arresting foliage of these easy-care, low growing perennials remains tidy well into November. Adequate water, mulch and a mid-season trim help ensure their staying power.

November's last hurrah.... The shorter days and cooler nights of November have set the garden ablaze with eye-catching foliar color. By planting an assortment of woody plants as well as herbaceous perennials and ornamental grasses, which promote late season allure, a last hurrah is easily achieved. Each of the plants included in this newsletter bestow either plump berries, late blooms, compelling foliage or artful branching patterns. Happy Digging!

Digging Dog's Early November 2018 Newsletter Link
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